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Painting Guides

Guide to Painting Wooden Kits  

A good starting point for painting is a spray with an acrylic primer. Use red oxide for brickwork, white for woodwork and grey for other parts. Thereafter almost any paint can be used, acrylic, enamel or household emulsion (tester pots are a good source).

Windows and doors

Windows are usually supplied in two halves, with a piece of film sandwiched in between for the glass. The lighter sides go back-to-back. It is a good idea to fully paint the windows before assembly.

Using a spray can or airbrush will cause the windows to fly off never to be seen again, so stick them gently, lighter side down, onto a piece of masking tape stuck to a board, and spray them with white acrylic primer and let dry. Apply further coats of your chosen colour as required, off-white and dirty cream look good for most situations. Don’t use pure white as is looks wrong on a scale model because it is too bright. Glazed doors are treated in the same way.

Brickwork

The following method works very well and looks realistic:

Fill in any wall joints and scribe any continuous brick courses. Mask off other parts and spray the brickwork with red-oxide acrylic primer and let dry. If any of the bricks are intended to be blue engineering brick then paint them now with a dark blue-grey colour.

Mix up a little runny powder filler with water and tint it light grey, or to your preferred mortar colour. Rub this into the bricks and immediately clean it off the face of the bricks. This will tone down the red-oxide nicely and looks very good.